White Privilege

Presented by Chain Reaction Theatre Project

Multiple venues

150 minutes

With intermission

Past performances

Friday, October 22 7:00 pm
  • Post-show discussion
  • Pay what you can night
Saturday, October 23 7:00 pm
  • Pay what you can night
  • Post-show discussion
Sunday, October 24 3:00 pm
  • Pay what you can night
  • Post-show discussion
Thursday, October 28 7:00 pm
  • Pay what you can night
  • Post-show discussion
Thursday, November 4 7:00 pm
  • Pay what you can night
  • Post-show discussion
Friday, November 5 7:00 pm
  • Pay what you can night
  • Post-show discussion
Saturday, November 6 7:00 pm
  • Pay what you can night
  • Post-show discussion
Sunday, November 7 3:00 pm
  • Pay what you can night
  • Post-show discussion
 
Drama Minnesota premiere

WHITE PRIVILEGE by Malaina Moore tells illuminating, raw, true stories about the consequences of white privilege on the Black experience in America. Performed in a series of vignettes by both Black and white actors, WHITE PRIVILEGE explores a wide range of issues surrounding race, including micro-aggressions, cultural appropriation, the education system and police brutality.

Directed by Justin Cervantes. Performed by Callie Baack, Emily Rose Duea, Madeline Karita Fleming, Naomi Cranston Haag, Kaz Fawkes, Jared Mogen, Tia Tanzer, Nandi Tippett, and Maretta Zilic.

Playwright Malaina Moore, a young Black woman, wrote WHITE PRIVILEGE when she was a student at Marquette University studying Theatre and Social Justice. The play has been produced four times to sold-out audiences in both Milwaukee and Madison, including one performance for a group of law enforcement officers. Moore’s play reflects her personal experiences and was inspired by a Facebook post that sparked discussion about what the term “white privilege” means to different people. 

Chain Reaction Theatre Project Founder and Artistic Director Shelley Smith says, “This play builds upon many of the issues from previous Chain Reaction Theatre Project productions that disproportionately affect People of Color. As Minnesota continues to struggle with racial disparities that are among the largest in the country, the state is growing more diverse as the white population declines. This play is especially timely following the killings of George Floyd and Daunte Wright, as more people are beginning to wake up and pay attention to the numerous BIPOC people who are senselessly brutalized and marginalized. True to our mission, the performances will raise awareness of the issues and show audiences how they can be part of the solution.”